The Mineralogical Record

Mines and Minerals of Mexico, vol. 7: Guanajuato, El Cobre, La Aurora, Flor de Pena

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The Mineralogical Record Bookstore: Mines and Minerals of Mexico, vol. 7: Guanajuato, El Cobre, La Aurora, Flor de Pena - T. P. Moore, W. E. Wilson, E. Ferry, J. des Revieres, P. K. M. Megaw, L. Megaw and W. I. Van Tichelen

Hardcover, 160 pages
1 edition, 2016
Published by Mineralogical Record, Inc.
Dimensions 8.3 x 11.1 (inches)
Price $75.00

Mines and Minerals of Mexico, vol. 7: Guanajuato, El Cobre, La Aurora, Flor de Pena

by T. P. Moore, W. E. Wilson, E. Ferry, J. des Revieres, P. K. M. Megaw, L. Megaw and W. I. Van Tichelen

MEXICO-III

This book, the seventh volume in our series on the mines and minerals of Mexico, was originally issued as vol. 47, no. 5 of the Mineralogical Record. It deals entirely with the famous Mexican mineral localities of Guanajuato, El Cobre, Cabrestante, La Aurora, and Flor de Pena (the type locality for legrandite), as well a photo spread on the Kerith Graeber collection of Mexican minerals, a biography of early Mexican mineral collector Ponciano Aguilar (1853-1935), after whom aguilarite was named, and new research revealing the formerly unknown Louis C. A. Legrand (1861-1920) after whom legrandite was named.

The mighty silver deposits of Guanajuato were first worked by the
Spanish in the mid-16th century, and are still yielding silver and gold today. Innumerable mines were opened along three main vein systems; the Valenciana, Rayas, Sirena, Cata, Cebada, Las Torres and Peregrina mines in particular have produced fine specimens of acanthite, polybasite, pyrargyrite, calcite and amethystine quartz. Guanajuato is also the type locality for aguilarite and guanajuatite.

The life of Ponciano Aguilar Frías (1853–1935), a civil engineer, mining superintendent, professor and mineral collector from Guanajuato, is a fine example of international and multi-occupational collaboration in mineralogy. His collection is preserved today in the Mineralogical Museum of the University of Guanajuato.

The El Cobre mine has produced distinctive tennantite-tetrahedrite
paramorphs on white quartz, brilliant pink calcite crystals, the best
specimens of Mexican scolecite, fine azurite crystals, and malachite
pseudomorphs after azurite to 12 cm. Some of the world’s finest crystals of scorodite (long attributed to the El Cobre mine) were found in 1966 in a single pocket in the nearby Cabrestante mine.

The Aurora mine, also known among collectors by the name of the nearest village, Cuchillo Parado, is one of the noteworthy wulfenite and vanadinite occurrences in the Chihuahua Desert. Discovered in 1828, the orebody has produced attractive specimens sporadically for the past 110 years.

The Flor de Peña mine in the state of Nuevo Leon, Mexico, is an
economically insignificant locality but it holds one special distinction: It is the type locality for the mineral legrandite, made famous among collectors by its spectacular occurrence 400 km to the west at the Ojuela mine.

Since the 1940s and probably before, mineral specimens from Mexico have been making their way north across the border and entering the American mineral market. Many fine specimens, some of them ranking as world-class, have entered private and public collections. Perhaps the best known private American collection is that of California mineral dealer Kerith Graeber, who has been building her suite of Mexican specimens for 40 years. Fifty of her finest specimens are illustrated here.




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